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Pennies and Nickels and Dimes…Oh, My!

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Summary

Students will play a game in which they determine the number of cents (pennies) that equal a nickel, dime, and quarter. The students will also identify which set of coins has more, fewer, or the same amount while also counting each collection and writing the corresponding value.

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will play a game in which they determine the number of cents (pennies) that equal a nickel, dime, and quarter.
  • The students will also identify which set of coins has more, fewer, or the same amount while also counting each collection and writing the corresponding value.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math

Grades

  • Kindergarten

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups

Background Knowledge

Students should have basic knowledge of:

  • The cent sign (¢)
  • Counting by fives and tens
  • Coins and the value of a cent, nickel, dime, and quarter

Terms and Concepts

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter
  • Value
  • Greater than
  • Less than
  • Equal to

Materials

  • The “What’s The Value?” worksheet
  • The “How Many Make a…?” worksheet
  • Colored pencils and/or crayons
  • One of each coin: cent, nickel, dime, and quarter
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Value card sets

Preparations

  • Make copies of the “What’s The Value?” worksheet (1 per student)
  • Make copies of the “How Many Make a…?” worksheet (1 per student)
  • Create value card sets, one per student plus a teacher set using the Value Cards resource page included.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/239.pdf.

  1. To review the value of a cent, nickel, dime and quarter as a class, play the following game with your students.
    1. Give each student a set of value cards. Tell them to lay out each card in front of them.
    2. Hold up one of the four coins for all students to see. Ask students to select a value card and hold it up to show the number of cents that the coin is worth.
    3. Ask the students how many cents this coin is worth. Solicit group response.
    4. Show the students the correct value (selected from the teacher’s set of value cards).
    5. Ask students if that coin’s value is greater than, less than, or equal to a different coin that you select.
    6. Repeat numerous times, randomly selecting one of the four coins. (As a challenge, display all four coins in a random order. Have the students place the corresponding value cards in that same order.)
  2. Introduce the “How Many Make a …?” worksheet. Review the directions with the class and ask students to complete this worksheet individually. When students finish, check worksheets for understanding.
  3. Work with students to complete the “What’s the Value?” worksheet. This can be completed as a class or in small groups with or without supervision as necessary.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Use coins or other manipulatives to complete “What’s the Value?” questions.
  • Compare coin amounts in terms of “more than,” “less than,” or “equal to.”
  • Hold up a value card and invite students to find different combinations of coins that equal the amount on the value card.
  • Have students use dice and change (cents, nickels, dimes, and quarters) to play a game in pairs. For each roll, the student will get that number of cents. Students will trade up for coins of greater value, and the first to reach a quarter wins.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Create an activity center in one section of the classroom where students can practice counting stacks of cents, nickels, and dimes in amounts up to $1.00.
  • Create a classroom store center where students can practice matching basic price tags with coin amounts.
  • Refer to “Lesson 2: Money Matters” in the 1999/2000 50 State Quarter Program® lesson plans for more topic-related work.

Use the game to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Describe several measurable attributes of a single object
Standards:

  • K.MD.2. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.
  • K.MD.3. Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • develop and use strategies for whole-number computations, with a focus on addition and subtraction;
  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for addition and subtraction; and
  • use a variety of methods and tools to compute, including objects, mental computation, estimation, paper and pencil, and calculators.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Communication
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication 
  • communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others;
  • analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others; and
  • use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.   

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