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Let’s Try for a Treaty

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Summary

Students will understand and explain the terms “treaty” and “diplomacy.” Students will apply and extend knowledge of these concepts through fictional situations of character conflict.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coin

Objectives

Students will understand and explain the terms “treaty” and “diplomacy.” Students will apply and extend knowledge of these concepts through fictional situations of character conflict.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • The writing process
  • Native Americans

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Native American
  • Treaty
  • Diplomacy
  • Peace
  • Character
  • Conflict

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “2011 Native American $1 Coin” page
  • Copies of the “A Treaty of Peace” worksheet
  • 1 copy each of two different age-appropriate texts that have basic examples of character conflict, such as:
    • Jamaica Tag-Along by Juanita Havill
    • Julius, the Baby of the World by Kevin Henkes
    • Ruby the Copycat by Peggy Rathmann
  • Chart paper
  • Construction paper or card stock
  • Markers, pencils, crayons

Preparations

  • Make copies of the “A Treaty of Peace” worksheet (1 per student)
  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “2011 Native American $1 Coin” page.
  • Locate two texts that have basic examples of character conflict (see examples under “Materials”).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/122.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information.
  2. Display the transparency or photocopy of the “2011 Native American $1 Coin” page. Tell the students that “reverse” is another name for the back of a coin, and “obverse” is another name for the front.
  3. Introduce the term “treaty.” Tell the students that the image on the coin is one way that people remember treaties of or with Native Americans. Explain the following:  The ability to make peace was very important to Native Americans. In order to make peace, Native Americans often made a “treaty”—an agreement—for peace between two groups. Native American tribes made treaties with other tribes and with settlers. The negotiation is called “diplomacy.”
  4. Ask the students to share ideas from their lives about when it might be important to use diplomacy or have a treaty (sharing toys, who is first in line, friendships, etc.).
  5. Introduce the students to the selected text. Explain that the students will be listening to a story in which some of the characters have a conflict, or disagreement, and that they will need to think how diplomacy could help resolve the conflict. Read the text aloud.
  6. After reading, discuss the conflict in the story. Ask the students how using a peace treaty could have helped the characters. As a class, write a treaty for the characters that experienced conflict in the story. Discuss how the treaty should be fair for both sides. Begin the treaty with “We agree…”
  7. Explain to the students that in the next session they will be listening to another story and writing their own treaty for the characters.

Session 2

  1. Display the transparency of the 2011 Native American $1 Coin. Review with the students the material covered in the previous session, particularly the importance to the Native Americans of diplomacy and the ability to make peace.
  2. Introduce the students to the second selected text. Explain to the students that they will be listening to another story in which some of the characters have a conflict and that they will need to think how diplomacy could help resolve it. Read the text aloud.
  3. Distribute the “A Treaty of Peace” worksheet. After some class brainstorming, ask the students to complete the worksheet to show how the characters could use a treaty to solve their problem.
  4. Have the students glue the coin circles onto construction paper or card stock and cut them out, then share their work. Display the coin treaties in the classroom.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs to create their coin treaties.
  • Allow students to dictate their written responses.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students write treaties for common problems with classmates, parents, teachers, or siblings.
  • Have students research Native American tribes.
  • Have students read other stories independently and create treaties for the characters.
  • Have students use pictures cut from magazines to create a collage representing the concepts of treaties and/or diplomacy.

Use the students’ class participation, worksheets, and final products to evaluate whethert hey have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.1.7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • RL.1.8. Not applicable to literature.
  • RL.1.9. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.1.4. begins in grade 3.
  • W.1.5. With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
  • W.1.6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.1.1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
  • RL.1.3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.K.4. begins in grade 3.
  • W.K.5. With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
  • W.K.6. With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.K.4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).
  • RL.K.6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).  
  • RL.K.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.K.9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Literature
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.