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Can You Picture This?

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Summary

Students will practice the skill of visualization as a means of demonstrating comprehension.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coin

Objectives

Students will practice the skill of visualization as a means of demonstrating comprehension.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Fourth grade
  • Fifth grade
  • Sixth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 45 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Small groups
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Visualization as a comprehension strategy
  • Agriculture in developing cultures

Terms and Concepts

  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Visualization
  • Circle of Life
  • Agriculture
  • Hunters and gatherers

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • Οverhead transparencies (or photocopies) of the following:
    • “2009 Native American $1 Coin” page
    • “Visualizing the Three Sisters” worksheet
  • Copies of the following:
    • “Visualizing the Three Sisters” worksheet
    • “Three Sisters of Agriculture Poster Rubric” (1 per student)
    • Native American $1 Coin Resource Guide (available at www.usmint.gov/kids)
  • Locate texts that give information about The Three Sisters of Agriculture, such as:
    • Indian Givers: How the Indians of the Americas Transformed the World by Jack Weatherford
    • In the Three Sisters Garden by JoAnne Dennee with Jack Peduzzi and Julia Hand
    • Foods of the Americas: Native Recipes & Traditions by Fernando and Marlene Divina
    • The Corn Grows Ripe by Dorothy Roads and Jean Charlot
  • Poster board
  • Markers or colored pencils
  • Magazines
  • Glue
  • Scissors

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “2009 Native American $1 Coin” page
    • “Visualizing the Three Sisters” worksheet
  • Make copies of each of the following:
    • “Visualizing the Three Sisters” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “Three Sisters of Agriculture Poster Rubric” (1 per student)
  • Locate a text that gives information about The Three Sisters of Agriculture (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Plan four places where you will pause in your reading so that students can draw on their worksheets what the text is describing.
  • Bookmark Internet sites that contain information about Native American culture.
  • Gather magazines that students can use in creating their posters.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/132.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information.
  2. Display the “2009 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency or photocopy. Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and “obverse” is another name for the front. With the students, examine the coin design, which is on the reverse of the 2009 Native American $1 Coin.
  3. Divide the class into small groups. Ask the groups to discuss the ways siblings interact using personal experience or vicarious experience (books, movies, TV shows, etc.). Have each group brainstorm a list of words that come to mind when they think of siblings. Share and discuss these lists.
  4. Display the “2009 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency. Have students describe what they see.
  5. Explain that the students are about to engage in a “visualization” activity. Explain visualization as the ability to see in the mind or to make visible something being described in words. This is an important strategy to use in reading and listening. Discuss how the students have used visualization strategies in the past. Establish procedures for today’s activity based on the readiness of the class. Distribute the “Visualizing the Three Sisters” worksheet and review the directions.
  6. Introduce the students to the selected text about the Three Sisters of Agriculture. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about agriculture and companion planting. Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  7. Allow time for the students to draw as the text is read and complete the “Visualizing the Three Sisters” worksheet. Discuss student drawings as a class. Collect the worksheets.

Session 2

  1. Review the information from the previous lesson about the Three Sisters of Agriculture.
  2. Explain to the students that Native Americans often depict the Three Sisters of Agriculture as three beautiful women. Ask the students if they can think of any other concepts or ideas that are depicted in specific ways and discuss. One such example is the concept of liberty being depicted as a woman on coins or as the Statue of Liberty.
  3. Divide the students into pairs or small groups. Distribute a “Three Sisters of Agriculture Poster Rubric” to each student and review the rubric. Explain to the students that they will create a poster that depicts the Three Sisters of Agriculture. Encourage the students to recall the information from the reading in Session 1 and use this knowledge along with the markers, colored pencils, and magazines to create the Three Sisters of Agriculture poster.
  4. Provide class time for student pairs or groups to complete their posters.
  5. Have student pairs or groups present the completed posters to the class. Display student posters around the classroom.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs on visualization.
  • Provide additional support by modeling the visualization strategy.
  • Allow students to use computer-generated graphics for the small group poster/coin activity.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students read Native American stories and create comic strips or other visualization products.
  • Have students create a readers’ theater or skit using the Three Sisters of Agriculture as their topic.

Use the students’ class participation, worksheets, and Three Sisters of Agriculture poster to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Knowledge to Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Literature
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience. 

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Time, Continuity, and Change
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • help learners apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity
  • enable learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, including but not limited to, the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the emergence of religious belief systems, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions
  • guide learners in using such processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and interpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, searching for causality, and distinguishing between events and developments that are significant and those that are inconsequential
  • provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment; and enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Culture and Cultural Diversity
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand and apply the concept of culture as an integrated whole that governs the functions and interactions of language, literature, arts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behavior patterns
  • enable learners to analyze and explain how groups, societies, and cultures address human needs and concerns
  • guide learners as they predict how experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference
  • encourage learners to compare and analyze societal patterns for transmitting and preserving culture while adapting to environmental and social change
  • enable learners to assess the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups
  • have learners interpret patterns of behavior as reflecting values and attitudes which contribute to or pose obstacles to cross-cultural understanding
  • guide learners in constructing reasoned judgments about specific cultural responses to persistent human issues
  • have learners explain and apply ideas, theories, and modes of inquiry drawn from anthropology and sociology in the examination of persistent issues and social problems

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Writing
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features