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A Day as President

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Summary

Students will identify the President as the leader of the United States government. Students will identify the jobs and responsibilities of the President of the United States.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Presidential $1 Coin

Objectives

  • Students will identify the President as the leader of the United States government.
  • Students will identify the jobs and responsibilities of the President of the United States.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Four
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

  • Obverse (front)
  • President of the United States

Terms and Concepts

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • The term “leader”
  • United States of America
  • Jobs and responsibilities

Materials

  • The worksheet attached to this lesson plan (see “Preparations”)
  • From the Presidential $1 Coin Lesson Plan Resource Center at www.usmint.gov/kids/pres$1coin/LP/resources regarding presidents Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and/orMadison:
    • Program overview
    • Images of coins
    • Information from the links provided
  • 1 overhead projector
  • 1 overhead transparency of each of the coin obverses
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that provides basic historical information about the role of the President of the United States. For example:
    • The U.S. Presidency (First Facts; Our Government Series) by Muriel L. Dubois and Christine Peterson
    • So You Want To Be President? by Judith St. George
    • If I Were President by Catherine Stier
    • President by Michael Twinn
    • Presidents by Carol Greene
  • Chart paper
  • “How-to” manuals (for example, directions for playing a board game or assembling a toy)
  • Markers, pencils, crayons
  • Drawing paper (8-1/2 X 11)

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency of each of the following:
    • One or more of the presidential $1 coin obverses
    • Golden Dollar
    • Susan B. Anthony dollar
  • Locate an age-appropriate text that provides basic historical information about the role of the President of the United States (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Make copies of the “Things To Do” worksheet (1 per pair of students).
  • Gather examples of “how-to” manuals (see examples under “Materials”).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/133.pdf.

Sessions 1 and 2

  1. Engage the students in a discussion about the meaning of the term “leader.” Record the students’ ideas on a class chart.
  2. On another piece of chart paper, write the following definition at the top: “A leader is a person who is the head of a group or activity.” Have the students brainstorm the names of leaders (for example, teacher, coach, fire chief) and record these on the chart.
  3. Ask the students to identify an important leader in the school, guiding them to name the principal. Discuss the role of the principal in the school (for example, making decisions, making sure everyone is safe, setting an example).
  4. Discuss with the students why they think it is important to have leaders and what some of their jobs and responsibilities may be. Responses may include helping to keep order, making sure everyone is safe, and making sure jobs get done.
  5. Distribute drawing paper to each of the students and have them illustrate a picture of a leader doing their job and label it.
  6. Share the drawings with the class.
  7. Tell the students that, just as school has a leader called the principal, the United States has an important leader too. Ask the students to name this leader directing them to the term “president.” Discuss the term “President of the United States” with the students. Ask them to share what they know about the President of the United States. List the students’ responses on chart paper.
  8. Display the transparency of any presidential $1 coin obverse.
  9. Explain to the students that this image is a presidential $1 coin. Ask the students if they know any other money that is worth a dollar. Responses may include the dollar bill, Golden Dollar, and Susan B. Anthony coin.
  10. Display the images of the Golden Dollar and the Susan B. Anthony coin. Tell the students that these coins, too, are marked “one dollar.”
  11. Ask the students what all of the people on the coins had in common. Explain to the students that each of the people were important to our country because they were leaders and this is one way for us to honor them.
  12. Tell the students that the presidential $1 coins were not intended to replace the dollar bill but be used in addition to it.
  13. Ask the students to examine the images and tell you what they know about them. The students should be able to identify them as the fronts (obverses) of coins and that they each depict a person. Tell the students that the Presidential $1 Coin Program began in 2007 to commemorate each of our nation’s presidents. The program calls for four new dollar coin designs to be released per year in the order the presidents served the country. Point out to the students that each obverse in the series depicts a different president and shows the years the president served in office and the number of that presidency.
  14. As a class, identify the jobs and responsibilities of the President of the United States. Responses may include taking care of the United States, making speeches to tell the people important news, and making sure jobs get done. Create a class K-W-L chart entitled “What Does a President Do?” filling in the first two columns.
  15. Tell the students they will be learning more about the jobs and responsibilities of the president.
  16. Introduce the students to the selected text about the president. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate predictions about what will occur in different parts of the text.
  17. Read the text aloud. During the reading, attend to unfamiliar vocabulary and concepts.
  18. As a class, review any new material learned from the text and add it to the last column of the K-W-L chart.

Sessions 3 and 4

  1. Review the text and K-W-L chart from the previous day.
  2. Explain to the students that sometimes people use books or manuals to help them learn how to do things, do a job, or learn something new. Show the students some examples of “howto” books as listed under “Materials.” Tell the students that they will be working as a class to create a book about the President based on what they have learned in class.
  3. Divide the class into pairs and distribute the “Things To Do” worksheet to each pair.
  4. Explain that each pair of students will write a description and draw an illustration about one of the things that the president does. Allow the pairs time to think of an idea. Review the ideas with each pair. Some ideas may be repeated depending on the size of the class.
  5. Allow the students time to complete the assignment.
  6. Once the pages are completed, have the students share their work with the class.
  7. Assemble the pages into a class book entitled “A Day As President.”

Differentiated Learning Options

Allow students to dictate their description on the “Things To Do” worksheet.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have a leader come visit the class and discuss their job and responsibilities.
  • Have students research the president’s home state and locate the state quarter from “The 50 State Quarters® Program” at www.usmint.gov/kids/index.cfm?fileContents=campCoin/coloring.cfm.
  • Compare an appropriate presidential $1 coin to another coin featuring the same president. Learn more about this president
  • Use the “Things To Do” worksheet to evaluate whether the students met the lesson objectives.
  • Take anecdotal notes about whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.1 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.1.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
    • Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges.
    • Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.
  • SL.1.2. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • SL.1.3. Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.1.1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.