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In Mr. Lincoln's Shoes

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Summary

Students will demonstrate basic map skills. Students will understand cardinal directions and use a compass rose.

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent

Coin Program(s)

  • Lincoln Bicentennial Cents

Objectives

Students will demonstrate basic map skills. Students will understand cardinal directions and use a compass rose.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Math

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Math

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Three
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Maps
  • Sequence
  • President

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Timeline
  • Compass rose
  • Cardinal directions (north, south, east, west)
  • Symbol

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the following:
    • "2009 Lincoln Cent Reverses" page
    • "Life of Lincoln I and II" double worksheet
    • "Lincoln’s Compass Rose" worksheet
    • "Mapping the Class" worksheet
  • Copies of the following:
    • "2009 Lincoln Cent Reverses" page
  • Four full-page cent reverse images:
    • "Lincoln's Boyhood in Kentucky"
    • "Lincoln’s Youth in Indiana"
    • "Lincoln’s Career in Illinois"
    • "Lincoln’s Presidency in Washington, DC."
  • "Life of Lincoln I and II" double worksheet
  • "Lincoln’s Compass Rose" worksheet
  • "Mapping the Classroom" worksheet
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about Abraham Lincoln, such as:
    • A Picture Book of Abraham Lincoln by David Adler
    • Abe Lincoln: A Boy Who Loved Books by Kay Winters
    • Meet Abraham Lincoln by Patricia Pingry
    • Abraham Lincoln (Rookies Biography) by Wil Mara
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about maps and cardinal directions, such as:
    • Me On The Map by Joan Sweeney
    • We Need Directions by Sarah E. DeCapua
    • Looking at Maps and Globes by Carmen Bredeson
    • Maps and Globes by Jack Knowlton
    • My Map Book by Sara Fanelli
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Construction paper
  • Tape
  • Pencils
  • Crayons

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • "2009 Lincoln Cent Reverses"
    • "Life of Lincoln I and II" double worksheet
    • "Lincoln’s Compass Rose" worksheet
    • "Mapping the Class" worksheet
    • Timeline using the four images from the "Life of Lincoln" worksheet
  • Make copies of each of the following:–"2009 Lincoln Cent Reverses" page (1 per student) (optional)
    • "Life of Lincoln I and II" double worksheet (1 per student)
    • "Lincoln’s Compass Rose" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "Mapping the Classroom" worksheet (1 per student)
  • Four full-page coin image worksheets to display on four walls in the classroom
  • Cut the "LIfe of Lincoln I and II" double worksheet into two worksheets, "I" for Session 1 and "II" for Session 2.
  •  Locate a text that gives information about Abraham Lincoln (see examples under "Materials").
  • Locate a text that gives information about maps and cardinal directions (see examplesunder "Materials").

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/136.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 2009 Lincoln Bicentennial One Cent Program for background information, if necessary. Tell the students that the United States Mint will recognize the bicentennial of Abraham Lincoln’s birth and the 100th anniversary of the production of the Lincoln cent by issuing four different one-cent coins in 2009. Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and "obverse" is another name for the front. While the obverse will continue to bear the likeness of President Lincoln currently on the penny, the reverse will change to bear four different designs, each representing a different period in Abraham Lincoln’s life. The four periods are:
    • Boyhood in Kentucky (1809–1816)
    • Youth in Indiana (1816–1830)
    • Career in Illinois (1830–1861)
    • Presidency in Washington, DC (1861–1865)
  2. Display the "2009 Lincoln Cent Reverses" overhead transparency or photocopy, mentioning that an image must be specially chosen to be on a coin. Ask the students what they know about Abraham Lincoln.
  3. Introduce the students to the selected text on Abraham Lincoln. Preview the text and illustrations and allow students to generate observations about Abraham Lincoln.
  4. Read the text. During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  5. After the reading, review the images on the coins. Ask the students why they think the images may have been chosen.
  6. Explain that each image represents one of the four major parts of Abraham Lincoln’s life.
  7. Display the "Life of Lincoln I and II" overhead transparency. Discuss with the students which aspects of Lincoln’s life are shown in the images. Explain that each happened at different times and in different states. Ask the students which order they think the events occurred in. Explain that a timeline is a schedule of events. Model a timeline for the students on chart paper using the past week’s events.
  8. Distribute the "Life of Lincoln I" worksheet and a "2009 Lincoln Cent Reverses" worksheet to each student. Tell the students that now they are going to put the events in order so they can create a timeline of Lincoln’s life. They are to cut out the events from the "Life of Lincoln I" worksheet and glue them in order as a verticaltimeline onto the back of the "Lincoln Cent Redesign Reverses" worksheet.
  9. Allow an appropriate amount of time for the students to complete this activity.
  10. As a class, share the timelines. Display a completed timeline on an overhead transparency using the "Life of Lincoln I" worksheet images.
  11. Collect the students’ worksheets.

Session 2

  1. Review the information from Session 1 on Abraham Lincoln.
  2. Display the classroom map of the United States as well as the overhead transparencyof the "Life of Lincoln I and II" worksheet.
  3. Explain to the students that, as a class, they are going to trace the life journey of Abraham Lincoln using a compass rose. Discuss the journey Lincoln must have taken to have lived in so many places.
  4. Introduce the students to the selected text on maps and cardinal directions. Preview the text and illustrations and allow students to generate observations about maps and cardinal directions.
  5. Read the text. During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary
  6. After the reading, discuss maps and cardinal directions with the students. Ask them to identify the cardinal directions. Have them write each direction on a piece of construction paper.
  7. As a class, label the classroom with the cardinal direction labels you just created.
  8. Tell the students they will be making a compass rose to help them travel to the places that Lincoln travelled. Tell the students that a compass rose is a circle with arrows that point north, south, east, and west, the cardinal directions, on a map (or a compass). Explain to the students that cardinal directions will help them know which direction to go when they follow Abraham Lincoln’s journey on the map.
  9. Display the overhead transparencies of the "Lincoln’s Compass Rose" worksheet and the "Life of Lincoln I and II" worksheet. Explain to the students that they are about to take a walk through Lincoln’s life. Using the map, they will place the images from their worksheet onto their compass rose, then help you place the coin images around the classroom.
  10. Distribute the "Lincoln’s Compass Rose" worksheet and the "Life of Lincoln II" worksheet to the students.
  11. Have them cut out the four boxes from the "Life of Lincoln II" worksheet and place the events on the "Lincoln’s Compass Rose" worksheet. Begin by leading them to glue the Kentucky image at the south position, then north to Indiana, west to Illinoisand finally east
  12. Allow an appropriate amount of time for the class to complete this activity.
  13. Review the worksheets as a class, then collect them.
  14. Have the students direct you in hanging the four full-page coin images in their proper places on the four walls of the classroom.

Session 3

  1. Review the previous sessions and discussions on maps and cardinal directions. Re-visit the directions labeled in the classroom and their location.
  2. Explain to the students that sometimes maps are made using symbols or pictures to represent different things. Ask the students what symbols could be used to repre-sent various things in the classroom. Record student responses on chart paper along with the symbol.
  3. Display the "Mapping the Classroom" overhead transparency. Tell the students that they are going to create a map of the classroom. Tell them they can either use the symbols from the class chart or their own. Remind them to draw the symbols in the proper location using the compass rose that is on their map.
  4. Distribute a "Mapping the Classroom" worksheet to each student. Allow them an appropriate amount of time to complete this activity.
  5. Share the maps as a class and display them.
  6. Review the maps and cardinal directions as a class.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs.
  • Allow students to use premade pictures to complete their maps.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students create maps of the school using a compass rose.
  • Have students research other presidents and the places where they lived. Have stu-dents map out these places using cardinal directions.
  • Have students create maps of their neighborhood.
  • Take anecdotal notes about the students’ participation in class discussions.
  • Evaluate the students’ worksheets for understanding of the lesson objectives
There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Measurement
Cluster: Apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • measure with multiple copies of units of the same size, such as paper clips laid end to end;
  • use repetition of a single unit to measure something larger than the unit, for instance, measuring the length of a room with a single meterstick;
  • use tools to measure; and
  • develop common referents for measures to make comparisons and estimates.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Measurement
Cluster: Understand measurable attributes of objects and the units, systems, and processes of measurement.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • recognize the attributes of length, volume, weight, area, and time;
  • compare and order objects according to these attributes;
  • understand how to measure using nonstandard and standard units; and
  • select an appropriate unit and tool for the attribute being measured.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features