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Making Cents

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Summary

Students will play a game in which they create monetary amounts using different coin combinations.

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • Generic

Objectives

  • Students will work cooperatively in small groups.
  • Students will add coins to equal a specified amount.
  • Students will understand that a certain value can be reached through the use of different sets of coins.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade
  • Second grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups

Terms and Concepts

  • Coins
  • Comprehension
  • Logical reasoning
  • Math fames
  • Number sense
  • Patterns
  • Problem solving

Materials

Enough circulating coins for each group of three students (plus the teacher) to have their own piles of coins. Each pile should have the same number of coins (for example, 10 pennies, 6 nickels, 6 dimes, and 4 quarters...$2 total).

  1. Divide the class into groups of 3 students.
  2. Explain the game instructions to your students.
    • The game begins when you write a coin amount for all the students to see. You then select coins out of the “teacher’s pile” that equal the displayed amount, but keep them covered.
    • You assign one group member to each role of counter, checker, or announcer for the group. These roles rotate at the start of each new round.
    • Each group has one minute to find a way to represent the coin amount using only the coins in the pile. After the minute is over, the announcer from each group reports back to the class what coin combination was used to reach the displayed amount.
    • Each group gets one point for being accurate with its coin combination. After you reveal the combination you used, an additional point goes to those groups whose choice of coins matched yours.
  3. Distribute a set of coins to each group of students. Each group should have the same number of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters. You will also have the same number of coins in the "teacher's pile"—for example: 10 pennies, 6 nickels, 6 dimes, and 4 quarters ($2 total).
  4. Play the game for as long or as short as you like!

     

Differentiated Learning Options

To extend this game for more advanced learners, invite the students to create multiple coin combinations for the same amount. Award an additonal point for each additional coin combination a student develops.

Enrichments/Extensions

To extend this game for more advanced learners, invite the students to create multiple coin combinations for the same amount. Award an additonal point for each additional coin combination a student develops.

Observe to see who seemed to have difficulty in adding up coins and who accomplished the task with ease. (In the process of play, students will see that there are many possible solutions to putting coins together to equal a specified amount. Equaling the teacher's choice is guesswork--random choice within a possible set--but accuracy counts for a point as well.)

Discipline: Math
Domain: 2.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Work with time and money
Standards:

  • 2.MD.7. Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using am and pm.
  • 2.MD.8. Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately.
    • Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • develop and use strategies for whole-number computations, with a focus on addition and subtraction;
  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for addition and subtraction; and
  • use a variety of methods and tools to compute, including objects, mental computation, estimation, paper and pencil, and calculators.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Connections
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

  • Recognize and use connections among mathematical ideas
  • Understand how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole
  • Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • understand various meanings of addition and subtraction of whole numbers and the relationship between the two operations;
  • understand the effects of adding and subtracting whole numbers; and
  • understand situations that entail multiplication and division, such as equal groupings of objects and sharing equally.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • count with understanding and recognize "how many" in sets of objects;
  • use multiple models to develop initial understandings of place value and the base-ten number system;
  • develop understanding of the relative position and magnitude of whole numbers and of ordinal and cardinal numbers and their connections;
  • develop a sense of whole numbers and represent and use them in flexible ways, including relating, composing, and decomposing numbers;
  • connect number words and numerals to the quantities they represent, using various physical models and representations; and
  • understand and represent commonly used fractions, such as 1/4, 1/3, and 1/2.