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Our Goal Pole

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Summary

Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the sequencing of events by studying the westward journey of the Corps of Discovery. Students will correctly use terms that indicate the sequence of events. Students will demonstrate an understanding of certain historical figures in United States history.

Coin Type(s)

  • Nickel

Coin Program(s)

  • Westward Journey Nickel Series

Objectives

  • Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the sequencing of events by studying the westward journey of the Corps of Discovery.
  • Students will correctly use terms that indicate the sequence of events.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of certain historical figures in United States history.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten

Class Time

Sessions: Four
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Sequence
  • American Indians

Terms and Concepts

  • Obverse (front)
  • Explorer
  • Reverse (back)
  • Ocean
  • Lewis and Clark
  • American Indians
  • Louisiana Territory
  • Nickel
  • Corps of Discovery
  • Goal

Materials

  • Images of Lewis and Clark
  • 1 overhead projector
  • Copies of the worksheets attached to this lesson plan (see "Preparations")
  • 1 copy of the Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Resource Guide (available at www.usmint.gov/kids)
  • Blank overhead transparencies
  • 1 copy of a text that provides basic historical information about the Lewis and Clark Expedition (see "Preparations")
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • Images of carvings of Pacific Northwest American Indians

Preparations

  • Make copies of the following:
    • "American Bison Nickel Reverse" page
    • "Keelboat Nickel Reverse" page
    • "Peace Medal Nickel Reverse" page
    • "Ocean in View Nickel Reverse" page
    • "Louisiana Territory Map"
  • Make overhead transparencies of the following from the Resource Guide:
    • "My Goal Pole" worksheet (1 per class, enlarged)
    • "My Goal Pole" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "My Coin" worksheet (1 per student)
  • Gather images of Lewis and Clark.
  • Locate a text that provides basic historical information about the expedition of Lewis and Clark, such as:
    • Lewis and Clark: Discover the Life Of An Explorer by Trish Kline
    • Lewis and Clark: Explorers of the American West by Steven Kroll
    • A Picture Book of Lewis and Clark by David Adler
    • Going Along with Lewis and Clark by Barbara Fifer
  • Gather images of carvings of Pacific Northwest American Indians.
  • Review the text to locate terms related to sequencing, such as "first," "next," "then," and "finally."

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/160.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Display images of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and explain that these men are very important to our country’s history. Ask the students to brainstorm ideas about what these men may have done. Explain to the class that these men were explorers and were named Meriwether Lewis and William Clark.
  2. Engage the students in a discussion about the meaning of the term "explorers," directing them to realize that an explorer is a person who goes to a new place to find new things. Have the students brainstorm the names of other explorers with whom they may be familiar, such as Christopher Columbus.
  3. Display the "Louisiana Territory Map" overhead transparency and show the students the area that Lewis and Clark explored. Note the area’s position in relation to your school’s location. Explain that the territory was explored a long time ago. Explain to the students that Lewis and Clark were looking for a water route across the continent to the Pacific Ocean. Tell the students that Lewis and Clark were also to befriend and learn more about the American Indian tribes they met on their way and to study the plants and animals in the new territory.
  4. Introduce the students to the selected text about Lewis and Clark. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate predictions about what will occur in the text. Explain to the students that, as you read the text out loud, the class will make a list of important events from the journey as they occur. Review the vocabulary related to sequencing that occurs in the text, such as "first," "next," "then," and "finally."
  5. Read the text aloud. During the reading, discuss the important events and record all responses on chart paper. Add a simple sketch next to each event to help non-readers remember these points. Link events on the chart using the sequencing terms. Attend to unfamiliar vocabulary and concepts.
  6. Discuss and review the chart and the order in which the events happened. In this discussion, guide the students to mention that Lewis and Clark traveled a very long way and endured hardships to reach the Pacific Ocean. Explain that reaching the Pacific Ocean was one of Lewis and Clark’s goals.

Session 2

  1. Review the chart from the previous class.
  2. Display the "Peace Medal Nickel Reverse," the "Keelboat Nickel Reverse," and the "American Bison Nickel Reverse" overhead transparencies. Explain to the students that these images represent significant parts of the journey of the Corps of Discovery. Relate these to the events and the sequencing terms on the chart from the previous session.
  3. Display the "Ocean In View Nickel Reverse" overhead transparency. Ask the students what they see in the image. Ask the students what parts of the text from the previous session they remember when looking at the coin.
  4. Discuss the quote on the coin, "Ocean in view! O! The joy!" Ask the students why they think those words are on the coin. Ensure that the students know the meaning of the word "joy." Discuss synonyms. Explain to them that Clark wrote that statement in his map journal upon reaching the Pacific Ocean. Discuss why it was a joy for him to see the ocean.
  5. Review what things may have been important to the Corps of Discovery, guiding the students to mention that they reached the Pacific Ocean. Add any new ideas to the chart from the previous session.
  6. Distribute a "My Coin" worksheet to each student. Explain to the students that they will pick one of the events from the chart and illustrate it on this worksheet. Allow time for the students to complete this activity.
  7. As a class, display the finished coins in sequential order of the events.

Session 3

  1. Review the chart and the coin display from the previous session. Highlight the various American Indian tribes that Lewis and Clark met during the journey.
  2. Display the "Louisiana Territory Map" overhead transparency and show the students the area where Lewis and Clark met the Plains Indians and the Northwest (Clatsop) Indians. Explain to the students that the Northwest Indians that Lewis and Clark met near the Pacific Ocean were different from those they had met before. Explain that they ate fish because they lived near the Pacific Ocean, some of them spoke English because they had met English-speaking travelers who had arrived by boat, and they made their houses out of trees because they lived near forested areas.
  3. Explain to the students that these American Indians also had many distinctive carvings and paintings in their houses and on their canoes. Explain that these pictures and carvings were of importance to them. Show some images of the carvings to the students.
  4. Create a class "goal pole" on the enlarged copy of the "My Goal Pole" worksheet. Explain to the students that each of the four sections of the pole will illustrate one key event from the journey. The top section will illustrate Lewis and Clark’s arrival at the Pacific Ocean. Copy the sequencing terms from the chart onto the goal pole to signify the order of events.
  5. Explain to the students that they will be creating their own "goal pole" in the next session to illustrate the journey of Lewis and Clark.

Session 4

  1. Review the class "goal pole," the coin display, and the chart from session 1.
  2. Explain to the students that now they will be using the chart and the coin display to create their own "goal pole" about the journey.
  3. Tell the students that they are to pick four events from the journey of Lewis and Clark to illustrate on the "goal pole." Direct the students to pay close attention to the sequence of the events that they choose to illustrate on their pole and to place them in sequential order. Assist the students with choosing sequencing terms for their goal poles.
  4. Allow the students 15 to 20 minutes to complete the task.
  5. Once the students are finished, have them share their completed assignments with the class. Display the finished poles.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Have students work in pairs on their "My Goal Pole" worksheets.
  • Give students access to the text read aloud to help them recall some of the significant points of the journey.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Students can create their own "goal pole" of something that they want to accomplish or have in their life.
  • Students can create another "goal pole" for other explorers or famous historians and their accomplishments.
  • Take anecdotal notes about the students’ ability to meet the lesson objectives.
  • Use the "My Goal Pole" worksheet to assess students’ understanding of the material presented, of sequencing, and of the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.K.4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).
  • RL.K.6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).  
  • RL.K.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.K.9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.K.1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  • RL.K.3. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.K Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.K.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
    • Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
  • SL.K.2. Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
  • SL.K.3. Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
  • SL.K.4. Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.6. Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.K.4. begins in grade 3.
  • W.K.5. With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
  • W.K.6. With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.K.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of books by a favorite author and express opinions about them).
  • W.K.8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.K.9. begins in grade 4.

This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.