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I Did It!

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Summary

Students will gain general knowledge of major historical events. Students will be able to identify and define the three major end marks and how to use them correctly in writing. Students will demonstrate understanding of the process of sequencing events and of telling a story. Students will create a picture book and a coin design to tell the story of an accomplish-ment from their lives.

Coin Type(s)

  • Nickel

Coin Program(s)

  • Westward Journey Nickel Series

Objectives

  • Students will gain general knowledge of major historical events.
  • Students will be able to identify and define the three major end marks and how to use them correctly in writing.
  • Students will demonstrate understanding of the process of sequencing events and of telling a story.
  • Students will create a picture book and a coin design to tell the story of an accomplishment from their lives.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Third grade

Class Time

Sessions: Four
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 121-150 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Nickels
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Sequencing events
  • Cause and effect
  • Punctuation
  • Story writing

Terms and Concepts

  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Lewis and Clark/Corps of Discovery
  • Explorer
  • Accomplishment
  • Louisiana Purchase

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector
  • Copies of the worksheets attached to this lesson plan (see "Preparations")
  • 1 copy of the Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Resource Guide (available at www.usmint.gov/kids)
  • Blank overhead transparencies
  • Copy of a text that provides information about the Lewis and Clark Expedition and the difficulties it faced (see "Preparations")
  • Chart paper and markers
  • White construction paper
  • Colored construction paper (optional, for cover)
  • Pencil, crayons
  • Stapler
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch (optional)
  • Yarn (optional)

Preparations

  • Make copies of each of the following:
    • "Louisiana Territory Map" from the Resource Guide (1 per student)
    • "How Does it End?" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "I Did It!" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "My Own Story Coin" worksheet ( 1 per student)
  • Make an overhead transparency of the following pages from the Westward Journey Nickel Series Resource Guide:
    • "2005 Nickels Obverse" page
    • "Ocean in View Nickel Reverse" page
  • Locate a text that provides information about the Lewis and Clark Expedition, such as:
    • Picture Book of Lewis and Clark by David A. Adler
    • Lewis and Clark: Explorers of the American West by Steven Kroll
    • The Travels of Lewis and Clark by Laura Bergen
    • How We Crossed the West: The Adventures of Lewis and Clark by Rosalyn Schanzer
    • Stories from Where We Live—The California Coast by Sara St. Antoine
    • Going Along with Lewis and Clark by Barbara Fifer
  • Cut white construction paper into approximately 4-by-8-inch pieces (8 per student).
  • On a piece of chart paper, create a chart with four columns. Label the columns "Challenge," "Cause," "Effect," and "Feelings."
  • Cut yarn into lengths for binding picture books (optional).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/175.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Display the "2005 Nickels Obverse" overhead transparency. Ask the students to examine it and tell you what they know about the picture. The students should be able to identify this as the obverse (front) of a nickel and identify the man as President Thomas Jefferson. Tell the students that the obverse design for the 2005 nickels will bear, for the first time in 67 years, a new likeness of America’s third president, Thomas Jefferson, and that the "Liberty" inscription on the coin is based upon Jefferson’s own handwriting.
  2. Display the "Louisiana Territory Map" overhead transparency. Show the students the area that Meriwether Lewis and William Clark explored. Note the territory’s position in relation to your school’s location. Explain that our country’s shape was not always the same as it is today. Point out the area that was the United States before the Louisiana Purchase.
  3. Explain to the students that, when our country was very young, President Jefferson bought some new territory for our country. After the purchase, he sent a group of people led by Lewis and Clark to explore this new territory.
  4. Tell the students that exploring this unknown land was a huge undertaking and took years to accomplish. Explain to the students that the Westward Journey Nickel Series TM commemorates this important expedition.
  5. On the map, show Lewis and Clark’s route to the students, pointing out that the explorers traveled over both land and water. Tell the students that one goal of the Expedition was to find a waterway that led from the East to the Pacific Ocean, known as the "Northwest Passage." Another goal was to explore the land all the way to the Pacific Ocean. When the expolorers reached the ocean, it marked the end of the first half of their difficult journey. Even though they had not found the Northwest Passage, seeing the ocean was the way the explorers knew that they had accomplished the goal of reaching the West Coast.
  6. Display the "Ocean in View Nickel Reverse" overhead transparency for the students.
  7. Discuss the image on the coin with the students. Have them discuss possible reasons why the ocean image and quote were chosen. Student reasons may include that the ocean view marked the final piece of the first half of the journey and one of the major accomplishments of the Corps of Discovery.
  8. Read aloud the quote found on the nickel from Clark’s map journal, "Ocean in view! O! The joy!" Ask the students about the meaning and importance of the quote. Student responses should include the Corps of Discovery’s excitement over finally seeing the ocean, a goal that was accomplished after more than a year of difficult travel.
  9. Ask the students what words might be used today to show excitement over the completion of a large task or accomplishment. Student responses may include words like "wow" and "awesome."
  10. Draw the students’ attention to the punctuation mark used with the quote on the coin. Review the name of the mark and when it’s used in writing. Student responses should identify the exclamation point and its use as showing strong feelings, surprise, or excitement.
  11. Record student responses on chart paper to be used for notes later.
  12. Review the period and question mark and when they are used in writing. Record the information on chart paper.
  13. Distribute a copy of the "How Does It End?" worksheet to each student.
  14. Review the directions on the top of the worksheet with the students. Allow them to work with a partner to discuss their answers and complete the worksheet.
  15. Review the answers as a class.

Session 2

  1. Display the "Ocean in View Nickel Reverse" overhead transparency and review the discussion from Session 1 about the emotions Lewis and Clark felt when they finally saw the Pacific Ocean.
  2. Introduce the selected text. As a group, preview the selected text and illustrations to generate observations about what may be happening in the text. Ask the students to listen for examples of the difficulties or challenges the Corps of Discovery faced when they were exploring the new land.
  3. Read the selected text aloud to the class. Invite the students to point out examples of difficulties the Corps of Discovery faced when they were exploring the new land. Student responses should include being in unknown areas, encountering strange animals, lacking food and shelter, and experiencing severe weather conditions.
  4. Display the "Cause and Effect" chart.
  5. Record the student responses on the chart paper. The students should understand the causes and effects of the challenges and some of the emotions Lewis and Clark had about these challenges. The teacher should provide an example for the students on the chart.
  6. Once a challenge is listed on the chart paper, discuss the cause and effect of the challenge. Ask the students to provide words that would describe how Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery were feeling when faced with the difficult situation during the journey.
  7. Record student responses in the last column of the chart paper.
  8. Review and discuss the chart with the students.
  9. Ask the students to think of a time that they have faced a difficult task or tried to accom-plish something new and succeeded. Have the students briefly share their example with a partner.
  10. Invite the students to share their accomplishments with the class. Record student responses on chart paper to help generate further student ideas.
  11. Review the responses with the class. Ask the students for key emotion words to describe how they felt when they accomplished their task. Student responses could include pride, relief, and happiness.
  12. Record student emotion words on the chart paper using exclamation points at the end.
  13. Distribute an "I Did It!" worksheet to each student.
  14. Tell the students they will use the worksheet to record details about their special accomplishment in story form and then create a picture book with captions to be shared with others.
  15. Display all charts from Session 1 in the room to be used as a reference for the students during writing time.
  16. Allow sufficient time for the students to generate ideas and work on their worksheet.
  17. Collect the "I Did It!" worksheets.

Sessions 3 and 4

  1. Review the chart paper and ideas discussed in the previous sessions.
  2. Distribute the "I Did It!" worksheets from the previous session to each student.
  3. Explain to the students that each question on the "I Did It!" worksheet now will become a page in their picture book.
  4. Distribute eight pieces of white construction paper to each student for the "I Did It!" picture books.
  5. Allow time for the students to write and illustrate the story of their accomplishment. Stress the use of captions and punctuation to explain the image. The students should also create a front and back cover.
  6. Bind the picture book together with staples or yarn.
  7. Display the "Ocean in View Nickel Reverse" overhead transparency.
  8. Distribute a "My Own Story Coin" worksheet to each student.
  9. Have the students draw an image on their coin outline to symbolize their accomplishment. The students also need to include their "famous quote" from the "I Did It!" worksheet.
  10. Allow sufficient time for the students to complete their coin outline.
  11. Display the coin images in the room or combine them to create a class book of student accomplishments.
  12. Invite the students to read their stories aloud to another class, using the punctuation correctly and reading with inflection.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Have students create a punctuation poster detailing each of the three marks discussed in the lesson. Have students create an example and an illustration of each mark.
  • Provide students with a scribe for writing their ideas on the "I Did It!" worksheet and creating their picture book.
  • Allow students to orally answer the questions on the "How Does it End?" worksheet.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students expand their "I Did It!" books to compare their accomplishments with those of Lewis and Clark.
  • Invite students to take their "I Did It!" books "on the road." Have students share their books with other students and staff at the school.
  • Have students create a poem and a watercolor to describe the beauty of something in nature when they saw it for the first time.
  • Have students create a handout explaining when and why other punctuation marks (commas, semicolon, and quotation marks) are used.
  • Use the worksheets and student-created picture books to evaluate the students’ ability to meet the lesson objectives.
  • Use the student created coin to evaluate the ability to meet the lesson’s objectives.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.3 Language
Grade(s): Grade 3
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.3.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.
    • Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.
    • Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).
    • Form and use regular and irregular verbs.
    • Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.
    • Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.
    • Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
    • Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.
  • L.3.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize appropriate words in titles.
    • Use commas in addresses.
    • Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
    • Form and use possessives.
    • Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).
    • Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words.
    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.3 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 3
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.3.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
    • Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.
    • Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.
  • SL.3.2. Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • SL.3.3. Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.
  • SL.3.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
  • SL.3.5. Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details.
  • SL.3.6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See grade 3 Language standards 1 and 3 here for specific expectations.) 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 3
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.3.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
  • RI.3.5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
  • RI.3.6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 3
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.3.7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
  • RI.3.8. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).
  • RI.3.9. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 3
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.3.1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • RI.3.2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
  • RI.3.3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.3 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 3
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.3.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
  • W.3.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
  • W.3.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.3 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 3
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.3.4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3.)
  • W.3.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 3.)
  • W.3.6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Writing
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Text
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound–letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).