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How Will We Get There?

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Summary

Students will understand that the state of Hawaii is composed of a group of islands. Students will identify different types of transportation used in the United States.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will understand that the state of Hawaii is composed of a group of islands.
  • Students will identify different types of transportation used in the United States.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Science
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Land and water forms
  • Different forms of travel

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Archipelago
  • Mainland
  • Obverse (front)
  • Transportation
  • Reefs
  • Reverse (back)
  • Island
  • Shoals

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency of each of the following:
    • "Hawaii Quarter Reverse" page
    • "Detailed Map of Hawaii" page
    • "Map of the United States" page
    • "How Will We Get There?" worksheet
  • "How Will We Get There?" worksheet (1 per student)
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • Globe
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about transportation and islands. For example:
    • I had a Dollar in Hawai’i by Jodi Endicott
    • Hawaii: Islands in the Sea by William Russell
    • Bunnies on the Go by Rick Walton
    • How We Travel by Rebecca Weber
    • The Island Light by Rosemary Wells
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • String
  • Crayons

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • "Hawaii Quarter Reverse" page
    • "Detailed Map of Hawaii" page
    • "Map of the United States" page
    • "How Will We Get There?" worksheet
  • Make copies of each of the following:
    • "Hawaii Quarter Reverse" (1 per student)
    • "How Will We Get There?" worksheet (1 per student)
  • Arrange to use the school gymnasium or an open area of the playground for a brief "field trip."

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/202.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Discuss the term "transportation" with the students. Explain that transportation is a means or system of carrying things, people, or goods from one place to another. Write the definition on chart paper. Brainstorm about different forms of transportation. Record the student responses on chart paper.
  2. Select one student to retrieve an item from across the classroom. The student should bring the object (such as a piece of chalk, a paper towel, a stapler, or a book) back to you.
  3. Ask the class whether walking was the best way for the student to get the object. Ask if it would it have been better for the student to run, to take a bus, or to fly. Lead the students to conclude that the best way to retrieve the object was for the student to walk. Explain to the students that they will discuss the best ways to travel to other places.
  4. Discuss the term "island" with the students. Explain that an island is a body of land completely surrounded by water. Record this information on chart paper. Have the students raise their hands if they have ever visited an island before. Ask the students what type of transportation they used to get to the island (for example: walking across a stream or footbridge, riding across a larger bridge in a car or train, taking a canoe or rowboat to an island in a lake, or taking a boat or plane to a larger island).
  5. Explain to the students they will be learning about the only state in the United States made up entirely of islands. Ask if anyone can identify the state.
  6. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the transparency of the "Hawaii Quarter Reverse" page.
  7. Tell the students that the back of a coin is also called the reverse, and "obverse" is another name for the front of a coin. With the students, examine the Hawaii quarter. Ask the students what they notice in the image. Discuss that the design shows the Hawaiian Islands and King Kamehameha I. Identify King Kamehameha I as the first person to unite the people of the Hawaiian islands long ago. Explain that Hawaii is the only one of the United States made up entirely of islands and is surrounded by the Pacific Ocean. Ask the students to count the number of islands shown on the coin.
  8. Display the transparency of the "Detailed Map of Hawaii" page. Explain to the students that the state of Hawaii is made up of more than 8 islands; it is an "archipelago" or chain of islands. Although there are only 8 islands shown on the quarter, there are actually more than 130 islands, "reefs" (lines of rocks or coral in thewater), and "shoals" (shallow sandy areas) which, all together, form Hawaii, some too small to show on the map. Add the terms and definitions to the chart paper.
  9. Ask the students what form of transportation they use to get from one place to another in their town. Discuss different ways to travel around their town, listing the answers on chart paper. Locate your state on a classroom map. Refer to the chart and ask which forms of transportation they use to travel within their state. Ask the students how they could travel to another state close to their own state. Lead the students to conclude that they could travel many different ways to another state.
  10. Locate Hawaii on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location. Make sure to discuss how Hawaii is often shown in a separate box on United States maps because of its great distance from the mainland. Discuss the term "mainland" and add the term and the definition to the chart paper.
  11. Locate Hawaii on the transparency of the "Map of the United States" page or on a globe. Show the students how Hawaii is separated from the rest of the United States by water. Use a string to show the distance from Hawaii to North America. Explain to the students that over 2,000 miles separates the Hawaiian islands from the mainland. Using the same length of string, model the same distance across mainland America. On a globe, model the same distance from Hawaii to Japan. Point out that Hawaii is only a little closer to North America than it is to Japan.

Session 2

  1. Review the charts and information from the previous session.
  2. Introduce the students to the selected text about transportation and islands. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about transportation and islands. Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  3. Create a T-chart with the title "Traveling in Hawaii." Label the left column "Within an Island" and the right column "Between Islands." As picture cues, draw one island on the left side and two islands on the right over the columns. Have the students think of different types of transportation. Add the student responses to the chart. Circle answers that are common to both sides of the chart.
  4. Ask the students to look at the chart again and think about how they would travel from the Hawaiian Islands to the mainland. Lead the students to conclude that there are only two ways to and from Hawaii: by air and by water.
  5. Take the students to the playground to play "How will you get there?" Divide the students into groups. Label different objects on the playground to represent locations (for example: place a "school" sign on the swings, label the school doors "grocery store," give the area under the monkey bars the name of a local library, and a distant tree could be "Hawaii"). Instead, you could have the students line up on one end of a basketball court and simply announce the destinations one at a time. In either case, have the students act out which type of transportation they would use to get there.
  6. Distribute the "How Will We Get There?" worksheet. Have the students draw three different ways to travel within an island and two different ways to travel from one island to another.
  7. Review the worksheet with the class. Display the worksheets in the classroom.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Have students work with a partner to complete the worksheet.
  • Provide pictures for the students to cut and paste onto the worksheet.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students explore the economic effects of living on an island (such as the costof transporting goods and providing services).
  • Have students create a classroom book about transportation in your state.
  • Have students create a neighborhood map.

Use the students’ class participation and worksheets to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.1.1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.1.2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.1.3. Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.1 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • SL.1.4. Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • SL.1.5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
  • SL.1.6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. (See grade 1 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.1.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of “how-to” books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).
  • W.1.8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.1.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.K Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.K.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
    • Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
  • SL.K.2. Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
  • SL.K.3. Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
  • SL.K.4. Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.6. Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.K.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of books by a favorite author and express opinions about them).
  • W.K.8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.K.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.K.1. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...).
  • W.K.2. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • W.K.3. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.1.1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.K.4. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RI.K.5. Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book.
  • RI.K.6. Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).
  • RI.K.8. With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  • RI.K.9. With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.K.1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.K.3. With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.1.4. Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.
  • RI.1.5. Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.
  • RI.1.6. Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.1.7. Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
  • RI.1.8. Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  • RI.1.9. Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

Discipline: Science
Domain: K-4 Content Standards
Cluster: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

  • Personal health
  • Characteristics and changes in populations
  • Types of resources
  • Changes in environments
  • Science and technology in local challenges

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Disciplinary Standards
Cluster: Geography
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • guide learners in the use of maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies to acquire, process, and report information from a spatial perspective
  • enable learners to use mental maps to organize information about people, places, and environments in a spatial context
  • assist learners to analyze the spatial information about people, places, and environments on Earth’s surface
  • help learners to understand the physical and human characteristics of places
  • assist learners in developing the concept of regions as a means to interpret Earth’s complexity
  • enable learners to understand how culture and experience influence people’s perceptions of places and regions
  • provide learners opportunities to understand and analyze the physical processes that shape Earth’s surface
  • challenge learners to consider the characteristics and spatial distribution of ecosystems on Earth’s surface
  • guide learners in exploring the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • help learners to understand and analyze the characteristics, distribution, and complexity of Earth’s cultural mosaics
  • have learners explore the patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth’s surface
  • enable learners to describe the processes, patterns, and functions of human settlement
  • challenge learners to examine how the forces of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of Earth’s surface; help learners see how human actions modify the physical environment
  • enable learners to analyze how physical systems affect human systems
  • challenge learners to examine the changes that occur in the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources
  • help learners to apply geography to interpret the past and present and to plan for the future
  • enhance learners’ abilities to ask questions and to acquire, organize, and analyze geographic information so they can answer geographic questions as they engage in the study of substantive geographic content

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Time, Continuity, and Change
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • help learners apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity
  • enable learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, including but not limited to, the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the emergence of religious belief systems, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions
  • guide learners in using such processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and interpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, searching for causality, and distinguishing between events and developments that are significant and those that are inconsequential
  • provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment; and enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features