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Lots of Lakes

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Summary

Students will learn the concept of “greater than” and “less than” through 1 to 1 correspondence. They will manipulate counters to determine which number is larger than the other.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will learn the concept of “greater than” and “less than” through 1 to 1 correspondence.
  • They will manipulate counters to determine which number is larger than the other.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

The students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Numerals as representations of numbers
  • Basic counting skills
  • More/greater
  • Less/fewer

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Reverse (back)
  • More than
  • Less than
  • Greater than

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • “Minnesota Quarter Reverse” page
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • Counters
  • Sticky note pads
  • Marker
  • Small plastic bags or other containers (1 per person)
  • “More, More, More!” worksheets
  • “Minnesota Quarter Reverse” page
  • Crayons

Preparations

  • Make copies of the following:
    • “More, More More!” worksheets (1 set per student)
    • “Minnesota Quarter Reverse” page (1 per student)
  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “Minnesota Quarter Reverse” page.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/217.pdf.

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the Minnesota quarter reverse. Locate Minnesota on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  2. With the students, examine the coin design. Have the students identify the images in this coin design, including the outline of the state of Minnesota, the pine trees, the water, the bird, the individuals fishing, and also the words “Land of 10,000 Lakes.”
  3. Ask the students whether they think that 10,000 lakes is a lot of lakes or just a few. Ask the students to explain their views. You might point out that the state has a picture of a lake on the quarter, so lakes must be important to Minnesota. Since Minnesota has 10,000 lakes, that might be more than other states have.
  4. Tell the students that they will determine whether ten thousand is a lot. Write the numerals “1” and “10,000” on the board. Ask the students which is more, one or ten thousand. The students should be able to see that the number 10,000 is more than 1. Place a sticky note labeled “More/Greater” next to the numeral “10,000.” Ask the students which is less, one or ten thousand. Place another sticky note labeled “Less” next to the “1.”
  5. Explain that the class will be looking more closely at the idea of “more” and “less.”
  6. Write the numeral “5” on the board and say it aloud. Have the students repeat the word aloud.
  7. To model the next activity, count out five counters and place them in a row on a table in front of the students.
  8. Write the numeral “2” on the board. Say it aloud and have the students repeat the word aloud.
  9. Model counting out two counters on the table in front of them. Place the two counters underneath the first row.
  10. Direct the students to look at the two rows. Ask which row contains more counters. The students should see that the row with five units has more than the row with two units. Place an adhesive note labeled “More/Greater” next to the numeral on the board that students say is more. Students should respond that 5 is more/greater than 2.
  11. Ask the students which row has fewer units. Place an adhesive note labeled “Less” next to the numeral that the students say is less.
  12. Repeat steps 6 through 10, using the numbers “seven” and “three.” Model this activity for your students at each step. The students should arrive at the conclusions that 7 is greater than 3 and that 3 is less than 7.
  13. Repeat this activity three more times as a class using different sets of numbers.
  14. Distribute a “More, More, More!” worksheet to each student. Direct the students to write their names at the top of the worksheet.
  15. Read through the directions for the first section with the students. Using the example in each section, model the activity. In section 1, the students will circle the group that shows more pictures of quarters.
  16. Allow the students to work independently to complete this section of the worksheet.
  17. Read through the directions for the second section with your students. Model how they should go about completing this section. In section 2, the students will draw pictures to match the given amounts and draw a circle around the group that has more quarters.
  18. Allow the students to work independently to complete this section of the worksheet.
  19. Read through the directions for the third section with your students. Model how they should go about completing this section. In section 3, the students will use their counters to determine and circle the higher number.
  20. Allow the students to work independently to complete this section of the worksheet.
  21. Collect the worksheets from your students.
  22. Display a copy of the “Minnesota Quarter Reverse” page.
  23. Have the students look closely at the picture and show with their counters how many people are sitting in the boat.
  24. Also with their counters, ask the students to show you how many birds are on the coin.
  25. Ask the students which group has more, the people or the birds? The students should respond that there are more people. Color in red the group that shows more and in blue the group that shows less.

Differentiated Learning Options

Begin this activity by reading a student participation book about counting such as:

  • How Much Is a Million? by David M. Schwartz
  • If You Made a Million by David M. Schwartz
  • One Hundred Hungry Ants by Elinor J. Pinczes

Enrichments/Extensions

Let the students show you examples of a specific number more or less than the number you start with (Ex: “Show me a number that is greater than 6.” “Show me a number that is less than 4.”).

Use the projects and class participation to evaluate whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Describe several measurable attributes of a single object
Standards:

  • K.MD.2. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.
  • K.MD.3. Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.CC Counting and Cardinality
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Compare numbers
Standards:

  • K.CC.6. Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, eg, by using matching and counting strategies.
  • K.CC.7. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals. 

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.CC Counting and Cardinality
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Count to tell the number of objects
Standards:

  • K.CC.4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
    • When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
    • Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
    • Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
  • K.CC.5. Count to answer "how many?" questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1-20, count out that many objects. 

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • develop and use strategies for whole-number computations, with a focus on addition and subtraction;
  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for addition and subtraction; and
  • use a variety of methods and tools to compute, including objects, mental computation, estimation, paper and pencil, and calculators.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • understand various meanings of addition and subtraction of whole numbers and the relationship between the two operations;
  • understand the effects of adding and subtracting whole numbers; and
  • understand situations that entail multiplication and division, such as equal groupings of objects and sharing equally.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • count with understanding and recognize "how many" in sets of objects;
  • use multiple models to develop initial understandings of place value and the base-ten number system;
  • develop understanding of the relative position and magnitude of whole numbers and of ordinal and cardinal numbers and their connections;
  • develop a sense of whole numbers and represent and use them in flexible ways, including relating, composing, and decomposing numbers;
  • connect number words and numerals to the quantities they represent, using various physical models and representations; and
  • understand and represent commonly used fractions, such as 1/4, 1/3, and 1/2.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features