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Over, Under, In, and Out

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Summary

Students will follow simple directions based on positional words.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will follow simple directions based on positional words.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Following directions
  • Positional words

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Reverse (back)
  • Positional words

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • “West Virginia Quarter Reverse” page
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • Chart paper/markers
  • Construction paper
  • Masking tape
  • “Connect the Spots” worksheet
  • Pencils
  • Crayons

Preparations

  • Make copies of the “Connect the Spots” worksheet (1 per student).
  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “West Virginia Quarter Reverse” page.
  • Use masking tape to create a large circle on the floor of your classroom.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/220.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the West Virginia quarter reverse. Locate West Virginia on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  2. With the students, examine this coin’s reverse. Read the coin inscriptions to the class. Have the students identify the images in this coin design, including the bridge, the water, the trees, and the rocks.
  3. Ask the students what this quarter design tells them about the state of West Virginia. Answers should include that the state has mountains and a lot of trees.
  4. Ask the students why they think this bridge and river might be important to West Virginia and accept all responses. Explain that this bridge made it possible for people to easily cross from one part of the state into another. Before this bridge was built, it took a very long time to cross this gorge.
  5. Ask the students to describe—without pointing—where the river is located in this picture. Direct the students to use a positional word to accurately describe the location of the river. The students should say that the river is BETWEEN the mountains or UNDER the bridge.
  6. Again, ask the students to describe where the bridge is located in the picture. The students should say that the bridge is BETWEEN the mountains or OVER the river.
  7. Move the students to an open area (preferably carpeted) in the classroom.
  8. Tell the students that they will be playing a game in which they will need to follow simple directions. Explain that you will give the students a direction and then you will count to five. By the time you reach the number five, the students should be quietly in their position. Tell the students that they will need to listen carefully to the directions for this game.
  9. Distribute a piece of construction paper to each student.
  10. Give the students the following directions and count to five between each movement. As you give the directions, write the positional word on a piece of chart paper. After the students are in position, draw their attention to the written positional word you used and the sounds or letters in the word.
    • Stand ON the construction paper.
    • Sit NEXT TO the construction paper.
    • Put the paper in FRONT of you.
    • Put the paper UNDER one foot.
    • Put the paper BETWEEN your feet.
    • Put the paper AROUND your arm.
  11. Draw the students’ attention to the tape circle on the floor of the classroom.
    • Direct the students to stand IN the circle.
    • Direct the students to stand ON the circle.
    • Have the students identify what is UNDER their feet.
    • Direct the students to stand OUTSIDE of the circle.
    • Direct the students to hold their hands OVER the circle.
  12. Direct the students to return to their seats. Post the positional words chart on the board.
  13. Distribute a “Connect the Spots” worksheet to each student and direct the students to write their names at the top of the page.
  14. Direct the students to look at the pictures on their pages and determine which word describes where the first image is in relation to the second on the West Virginia quarter (Ex.: The bridge is OVER the river.)
  15. As a class, find this positional word on the chart and direct the students to write that word on the line.
  16. Repeat this process for all of the missing words on this page.
  17. Distribute crayons to each student. Allow the students to color the pictures on the page.
  18. Collect the student worksheets.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Rather than having the students copy the positional word from the class chart, write the words on the lines using dashed letters. Guide the students to read or identify the word on the line and then to trace it on their paper.
  • Create a class center to review positional words. Have an image of a dog and a doghouse. Have students place the dog, according to the directions, in a specific place (Ex.: above the house, on the house, under the house).

Enrichments/Extensions

If your state’s quarter design already exists, make a copy of the design for each student. Direct the students to create a sentence about the images on this coin’s design using one of the words from the class chart. Direct the students to illustrate this sentence once it is written.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Knowledge to Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features