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How Resourceful Are You?

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Summary

Students will describe the differences between natural resources, human resources, and capital resources.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will describe the differences between natural resources, human resources, and capital resources.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Second grade
  • Third grade

Class Time

Sessions: Three
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Goods
  • Services
  • Needs
  • Wants

Terms and Concepts

  • Resources
  • Natural resources
  • Human resources
  • Capital resources

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “Nevada Quarter Reverse” page
  • “Resource Coins” sheet
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • Chart paper
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about resources, such as:
    • From Wheat to Bread (Start to Finish Series) by Stacy Taus-Bolstad
    • Start to Finish Series
    • Paper, Paper Everywhere by Gail Gibbons
    • How a Book is Made by Aliki
    • My First Book of How Things are Made by George Jones
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about the state of Nevada, such as:
    • S Is for Silver: A Nevada Alphabet (Discover America State By State Alphabet Series) by Eleanor Coerr
    • Nevada by Dennis Brindell Fradin & Judith Bloom Fradin
    • Nevada (America the Beautiful) by Dee Lillegard and Wayne Stoker
    • Nevada by Karen Sirvaitis
    • Nevada Facts and Symbols (The States and Their Symbols) by Karen Bush Gibson
  • Construction paper, 12 X 18 inches
  • Glue
  • Scissors

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “Nevada Quarter Reverse” page.
  • Locate a copy of a text that gives information about resources (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Locate a copy of a text that gives information about Nevada (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Make copies of the “Resource Coins” sheet (2 or 3 copies per student).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/264.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Review the terms “goods” (things that people make or use to satisfy needs and wants) and “services” (activities that satisfy people’s needs and wants). Write out the definitions on chart paper. Create a T-chart labeled “Goods” and “Services.” Ask the students for examples of each and list them on the chart.
  2. Introduce the students to the selected text on resources. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate predictions about what is occurring in the text. Ask the students to listen carefully for information about any resources that could be used to produce goods and services. Read the text aloud to the class. Attend to unfamiliar vocabulary and concepts.
  3. Ask the students to name some goods and services from the text. Record the students’ answers on the T-chart.
  4. Ask the students to identify materials, machines, tools, buildings, people, etc. that were used to produce these different goods and services. Pick one item such as bread or milk. Ask the students to list what resources are used to make the item. List these on a separate T-chart labeled “Item” and “Resources.”
  5. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the “Nevada Quarter Reverse” page Locate Nevada on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  6. With the students, examine the design. Have the students identify the images and writing, including the words “The Silver State,” the mountains, the sun, the sagebrush, and the horses. Write these on a piece of chart paper with the heading “Nevada.”
  7. Lead a class discussion regarding the images and explain the following to the students.
    • Nevada has the largest wild horse population of any state. These horses run free on public lands.
    • A portion of the Sierra Nevada mountain range is located in Nevada.
    • Nevada became a state in 1864.
    • Nevada’s nickname is “The Silver State” because much of the silver found in the United States is found in Nevada. Explain that Nevada also produces gold, oil, and salt.
    • A large area called “The Great Basin” covers much of Nevada. Sagebrush, which is shown on the coin, is the state flower of Nevada and grows in the desert of the Great Basin.
  8. Explain to the students that the images on the coin are all resources. Explain to the students that resources are used to produce goods and services. Using the “Nevada” list, ask the students what goods and services they could use these different things for. List these goods and services on the “Goods and Services” T-chart.
  9. Have students think of additional resources and add them to a second list labeled “Other Resources.”
  10. Have the students draw three large circles on a sheet of paper and group the resources from the “Nevada” and “Other Resources” charts within the circles according to similarities.
  11. Discuss with students the three groups they came up with and the criteria they used for the groupings.

Sessions 2 and 3

  1. Review the charts and resource lists from the previous session. Review the definition of “resources.” Discuss the similarities the students found among the resources. Discuss the three types of resources (human, capital, and natural). Make a class chart with three large circles and label them “Human Resources,” “Natural Resources,” and “Capital Resources.” Divide the resources from the lists into the appropriate circles.
  2. Display the transparency or photocopy of the “Nevada Quarter Reverse” page. Review the resources shown on the coin. Ask the students if they can find something that the resources have in common. Guide the students to the conclusion that all of these resources are found in nature and are called “natural resources.”
  3. Look at the “Nevada” and “Other Resources” lists. Ask the students if all of the things listed would come under the heading of natural resources. Explain to the students that there are two other types of resources besides natural resources.
  4. Explain that buildings, people who work in the tourist trade, machines and tools used to produce goods and services, and so on are all resources. Ask the students for examples of tourism, buildings, and machines from their own state.
  5. Introduce the students to a text about Nevada. Ask the students to listen carefully for information about any resources that could be used to produce goods and services.
  6. Read the text aloud to the class. Attend to unfamiliar vocabulary and concepts. During the reading, add resources covered in the book to the “Nevada” list.
  7. Identify the two other types of resources needed to produce goods or services: human (people working to produce goods and services) and capital (goods made by people and used to produce other goods and services, such as machines, tools, and buildings).
  8. Distribute a “Resource Coins” page to each student. Explain to the students that they are to draw and label one resource from the “Nevada” resource list on each of the coins on the page. They are then to cut the coins out from the paper. Model this for the students by drawing on the overhead transparency a resource taken from one of the coin images on the “Resource Coins” worksheet. Discuss whether the example resource is a natural, human, or capital resource.
  9. Allow time for the students to complete the activity.
  10. Distribute construction paper to the students. Have the students head the paper “Resources.” Have the students divide the paper into three columns and label them “Natural,” “Human,” and “Capital.”
  11. Have the students glue their coins to the paper in the appropriate columns.
  12. Have the students discuss their papers with a partner.
  13. Collect the students’ papers when finished and display them in the classroom.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Have coins available that show resources.
  • Have students work in pairs to complete the activity.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students find resources from their own state.
  • Have students design a brochure or multimedia presentation on the three different types of resources.

Evaluate the students’ class participation and worksheets for achievement of the lesson’s objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

  • Students understand and use similarities and differences between characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines
  • Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

  • Students know the differences between materials, techniques, and processes
  • Students describe how different materials, techniques, and processes cause different responses
  • Students use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories
  • Students use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Production, Distribution, and Consumption
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • enable learners to explain how the scarcity of productive resources (human, capital, technological, and natural) requires the development of economic systems to make decisions about how goods and services are to be produced and distributed
  • help learners analyze the role that supply and demand, prices, incentives, and profits play in determining what is produced and distributed in a competitive market system
  • help learners compare the costs and benefits to society of allocating goods and services through private and public means
  • assist learners in understanding the relationships among the various economic institutions that comprise economic systems such as households, businesses, banks, government agencies, labor unions, and corporations
  • guide learner analysis of the role of specialization and exchange in economic processes
  • provide opportunities for learners to assess how values and beliefs influence private and public economic decisions in different societies
  • have learners compare basic economic systems according to how they deal with demand, supply, prices, the role of government, banks, labor and labor unions, savings and investments, and capital
  • challenge learners to apply economic concepts and reasoning when evaluating historical and contemporary social developments and issues
  • enable learners to distinguish between domestic and global economic systems, and explain how the two interact
  • guide learners in the application of economic concepts and principles in the analysis of public issues such as the allocation of health care or the consumption of energy, and in devising economic plans for accomplishing socially desirable outcomes related to such issues
  • help learners critically examine the values and assumptions underlying the theories and models of economics
  • help learners to distinguish between economics as a field of inquiry and the economy

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features