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Colonial Vacation

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Summary

Students will use website designs (from “This Great State!” lesson) and other U.S. travel resources and maps to plan a family vacation to states that were among the original 13 colonies.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will use website designs (from “This Great State!” lesson) and other U.S. travel resources and maps to plan a family vacation to states that were among the original 13 colonies.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math
  • Social Studies

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts

Grades

  • Fourth grade
  • Fifth grade
  • Sixth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Individual work

Terms and Concepts

  • Map skills
  • Multi-step problem solving
  • Colonial America
  • Statehood
  • Historical landmarks

Materials

  • Colonial Vacation Planner work pages (pages 16 and 17)
  • Web site designs from “This Great State! (optional) (pages 10-13)
  • Reference/tourism materials about the original 13 colonies/states
  • Pencils
  • Markers, colored pencils, and/or crayons
  • Glue
  • Stapler or other book-binding material (e.g., hole puncher and yarn)

Preparations

  • Review lesson.
  • Make several copies of the work pages for each student.
  • Cut pages in half vertically.
  • Gather U.S. maps or atlases with mileage scales.
  • Gather other state tourism materials.
  • Bookmark state home pages, the United States Mint website home page(www.USMINT.gov), and/or travel websites for Internet research (optional).
  • Make a sample Colonial Vacation Planner (for demonstration).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/351.pdf.

  1. Explain to students that they will be planning a summer vacation for their families, during which they will visit some of the states that were the original 13 colonies. They will need to determine which historical landmarks they will visit in each state, map their route, calculate the mileage, and determine how much money they will spend on gasoline.
  2. Hand out the “Colonial Vacation Planner” templates (pages 16 and 17), several copies of each strip to each student. Show the sample “Colonial Vacation Planner” and explain to students that they will be making a booklet to organize all their travel information.
  3. Allow students time to research and decide which states they would like to visit.  Then instruct them to gather details and decide which landmarks will be visited.
  4. When these decisions have been made, students will be ready to begin using maps to figure out mileage and gasoline costs. Ask students to assume the average car gets 200 miles to a tank (optional: students can find out from their parents the actual MPG of their family car). If not covered previously, students will need some instruction on how to use a mileage scale.
  5. After all information has been gathered and recorded, students should begin to assemble their Colonial Vacation Planner books.

How to Create a Colonial Vacation Planner

  1. First, students should complete the cover by coloring in the states they will visit and charting their route between the states.

  2. Next, students should record the first state they will visit and decide which landmarks to see and enter these landmarks on the “State Landmark Log” (page 16), along with information about the historical significance of the landmark.

  3. Students should then use maps to determine the mileage from the first landmark to the second and from the second landmark to the third and enter this information in the “State Landmark Log” (page 16).

  4. Students should use the “Trip Mileage and Gas Log” (page 17) to record starting and ending points for that segment of the trip, mileage information, and gasoline expenditures.

  5. Students can then use the “State Landmark Journal” (page 17) to draw and write about the state.

  6. Students should complete the three sheets for each of the states along their route.

  7. The “Trip Mileage and Gas Log” (page 17) will help students keep track of total mileage and gas expenditures for the trip as a whole.

  8. When the Colonial Vacation Planner pages are finished, books should be bound using either staplers, a hole punch with yarn or string, or plastic ring binders.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students plan a field trip to a local historical site.
  • Take the field trip!

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 4.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade 4
Cluster: Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit
Standards:

  • 4.MD.1. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm, kg, g, lb, oz, l, ml, hr, min and sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two column table.
    • For example, know that 1ft is 12 times as long as 1in. Express the length of a 4ft snake as 48in. Generate a conversion table for feet and inches listing the number pairs (1, 12), (2, 24), (3, 36), ...
  • 4.MD.2. Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.
  • 4.MD.3. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. For example, find the width of a rectangular room given the area of the flooring and the length, by viewing the area formula as a multiplication equation with an unknown factor. 

Discipline: Math
Domain: 5.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade 4
Cluster: Represent and interpret data
Standards:

  • 5.MD.2. Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for multiplication and division and use these combinations to mentally compute related problems, such as 30 × 50;
  • develop fluency in adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers;
  • develop and use strategies to estimate the results of whole-number computations and to judge the reasonableness of such results;
  • develop and use strategies to estimate computations involving fractions and decimals in situations relevant to students' experience;
  • use visual models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms to add and subtract commonly used fractions and decimals; and
  • select appropriate methods and tools for computing with whole numbers from among mental computation, estimation, calculators, and paper and pencil according to the context and nature of the computation and use the selected method or tools.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features