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The Growth of a Nation

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Summary

Students will identify and explain the variables that shaped the identity of states in the union prior to 1812. They will also explain how the individual identity of the states contributed to the success the young nation.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will identify and explain the variables that shaped the identity of states in the union prior to 1812.
  • They will also explain how the individual identity of the states contributed to the success the young nation.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Ninth grade
  • Tenth grade
  • Eleventh grade
  • Twelfth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Four
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Individual work

Terms and Concepts

  • The United States Mint 50 State Quarters® Program
  • State identity
  • National identity
  • Economic, political, and cultural variables

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Missouri quarter reverse
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “Quarter Designs” page on page 59
  • Copies of the following:
    • “50 State Quarters® Program Overview” sheet on page 45
    • “State Search” assignment (1 per student)
    • “Quarter Designs” sheet on page 59 (1 per student)
    • “Coin Outline” sheet (1 per student)
    • “Presentation Rubric” (1 per group)
    • “Quarter Concepts” note-taking guide (several per student)
    • “Quarter Information” sheets on pages 46 to 57 (1 packet per group)
  • Chalkboard
  • Chalk
  • A reserved computer lab with Internet access
  • Large sheets of white bulletin board paper (1 per group)
  • Markers (1 set per group)

Preparations

Make copies of necessary materials.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/366.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Show the students a Missouri quarter reverse and display an overhead transparency or photocopy of the same quarter’s reverse for all the students to see. Ask the students if they have ever seen this coin, and what they know about it. Who produces this coin?What does it commemorate? If necessary, reference the “50 State Quarters® Program Overview” page to describe the 10 year coinage program.
  2. Examine the coin design and ask students to identify the items depicted. How are these images important to the state’s identity? List and display student responses on the board.
  3. As a class, categorize the student responses into three identity variable categories; Political, Economic, and Cultural. Using the Missouri quarter, students may identify the image of the Corps of Discovery as a political variable, the Mississippi River as an economic variable, and the Gateway Arch as a cultural variable. Allow the students to discuss varying opinions.
  4. Continue the class discussion with a focus on the ways in which political, economic, and cultural variables work together to shape the identity of a state.
  5. Explain that the students will be completing a group project where they will explore the political, economic and cultural variables that contributed to the identity of each state which existed prior to 1812.
  6. Place students into groups of three.
  7. Assign each group the responsibility for researching a state that entered the union prior to 1812. These states include Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio. 
    Note: Although each state will not be represented, be sure to assign those states whose political, economic and cultural variables most strongly affected the identity of our nation during this time period.
  8. In their groups, direct each student to decide on one of the following research topics: the economics, the politics, or the culture of their assigned state, prior to 1812. Explain that all three topics will be needed for a future assignment.
  9. Distribute a “State Search” assignment to each student and explain that they will be conducting their research as a class during the next session.

Session 2

  1. Visit the computer lab as a class.
  2. Review the class assignment and instruct students to independently conduct research on their assigned state with a focus on their selected topic (i.e. the economic conditions of Rhode Island prior to 1812).
  3. To each student, distribute a copy of the “Quarter Designs” page and direct their attention to their assigned state’s quarter design.
  4. Distribute a “Coin Outline” page to each student. Explain that each student will create a new quarter design based on their own research (i.e. a drawing related to a tobacco farm for Maryland). Students must be prepared to share their drawing and information with their group on the following day.

Sessions 3 and 4

  1. Assemble students into their groups from session 1 and direct them to share their drawings and research.
  2. Distribute a large sheet of white paper, markers, and a “Presentation Rubric” to each group.
  3. Allow students twenty minutes to integrate each group member’s individual information into a new coin reverse depicting an appropriate representation of the state’s identity based on its political, economic, and cultural variables prior to 1812. They will also discuss how these variables affected the growth/success of the nation as a whole.
  4. Distribute a “Quarter Concepts” note-taking guide to each student and a “Quarter Information” packet to each group. Explain that, as each group presents its coin, the remainder of the students will listen to the presentations and take notes on their guides. These notes will help the students complete a later essay assignment.
  5. Each group will present its coin to the class, explaining the factual reasons for the design and the effect of these variables on the growth/success of the nation.
  6. Following each individual group’s presentation, display the overhead transparency of the state’s quarter design.
  7. Ask the class to consider the quarter design and why that design may have been selected.  Then, using the information from the related page in the “Quarter Information” packet, have the students read the factual information behind this quarter’s design. Solicit student opinions on whether or not the quarter design is similar to the group’s representation of the state’s identity.
  8. Assign students an essay in which they use examples from class to respond to the following questions: How did political, economic, and cultural variables provide each state with an individual identity that in turn contributed to the overall success of the young nation?  Looking at the actual quarter design for this state, have these variables stayed the same or changed? How do you know?
  9. Allow students any remaining class time to meet with a member from a different group to discuss the effects that his or her assigned state had on the growth and success of the nation.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Analyze variables that caused or could cause friction within the Union.
  • Introduce/review the principle of federalism and how the identities of the states relate to this principle.
  • Research and evaluate the actual process used to create the quarters that are a part of the
  • United States Mint 50 State Quarters Program and its connection to federalism.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Culture and Cultural Diversity
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand and apply the concept of culture as an integrated whole that governs the functions and interactions of language, literature, arts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behavior patterns
  • enable learners to analyze and explain how groups, societies, and cultures address human needs and concerns
  • guide learners as they predict how experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference
  • encourage learners to compare and analyze societal patterns for transmitting and preserving culture while adapting to environmental and social change
  • enable learners to assess the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups
  • have learners interpret patterns of behavior as reflecting values and attitudes which contribute to or pose obstacles to cross-cultural understanding
  • guide learners in constructing reasoned judgments about specific cultural responses to persistent human issues
  • have learners explain and apply ideas, theories, and modes of inquiry drawn from anthropology and sociology in the examination of persistent issues and social problems

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Individual Development and Identity
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners in articulating personal connections to time, place, and social/cultural systems
  •  help learners to appreciate and describe the influence of cultures, past and  present, upon the daily lives of individuals
  • assist learners to describe how family, religion, gender, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status, and other group and cultural influences contribute to the development of a sense of self
  • have learners apply concepts, inquiry, methods, and theories in the study of human growth and development, learning, motivation, behavior, perception, and personality
  • guide learners as they analyze the interactions among ethical, ethnic, national, and cultural factors in specific situations
  • help learners to analyze the role of perceptions, attitudes, values, and beliefs in the development of personal identity and their effect upon human behavior
  • have learners compare and evaluate the impact of stereotyping, conformity, acts of altruism, discrimination, and other behaviors on individuals and groups
  • help learners understand how individual perceptions develop, vary, and can lead to conflict
  • assist learners as they work independently and cooperatively within groups and institutions to accomplish goals
  • enable learners to examine factors that contribute to and damage one’s mental health; and analyze issues related to mental health and behavioral disorders in contemporary society

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features